Photo: STAR/Excerpt from Facebook

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Photo: STAR/Excerpt from Facebook

The people working behind the camera often go unnoticed, but their efforts are often what makes a project as perfect as it looks on screen. Costume design is essential to bringing a character to life, and yet the craft is sometimes overlooked by viewers and even critics.

Edila Farid Turin is the young artist behind your favorite films, including “Matir Projar Deshe”, “No Dorai”, “Nona Joler Kabbo” and “Rickshaw Girl”. She was crowned Best Costume Designer at Blender’s Choice-The Daily Star OTT & Digital Content Award for her stellar work in Syed Ahmed Shawki’s “Taqdeer”.

“I am grateful for this recognition – it motivates the technicians to continue to work better,” says Turin. “After the National Film Prize, this is the first event that rewards technicians who work behind the camera. It’s a great achievement for us.”

Since childhood, Turin dreamed of becoming a fashion designer. However, she took a little detour and became a costume designer instead — and the road has served her well. “I started working as an assistant director in 2009 with Piplu R Khan’s Applebox”, shares the artist.

“At that time, I did a number of jobs, including costume design, art direction, and assistant director. I wasn’t even sure I wanted to be an assistant director in the first place.”

After winning Best Costume Designer for “Taqdeer”.

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After winning Best Costume Designer for “Taqdeer”.

Turin says that when she started working, the industry was not as liberal as it is today. It was just a small space with the same list of directors. “The scenario has changed in recent years and the prospects for technicians have widened,” she adds. “What’s interesting is that the ‘Matir Projar Deshe’ team scouted me without reference to other people. I wasn’t sure I could because I was too young at the time. ‘era.”

According to her, costume design is a crucial element for a project. “If a character is in the right costume, it makes the audience feel the character. Likewise, audiences will find it hard to believe in a character who doesn’t look like the role,” says the artist, who finished his honors in Media and Journalism from the Liberal Arts University of Bangladesh (ULAB).

Turin shared that while working in “Taqdeer,” they tried on several outfits for Chanchal Chowdhury to make him look like the character of a freezer van driver. “It was difficult, but we did it with the utmost perfection,” the artist shared.

Turin is the founder of the Oscar Blue team, named after her pet cats Oscar and Blue, who are no longer with her. “I want to keep them alive in my life, that’s why I named the studio after them,” Turin adds.

The designer wants to focus more on character design in the future and expand her studio by establishing her profession. As long as more people explore their passion, whether in front of or behind the camera, the pursuit of excellence in costume design will be worth it for Edila Farid Turin.